#2016Highlights Month-by-Month: Part 2


Contrary to the sense of things at the end with the triumph of he-who-shall-not-be-named and the demise of so many beloved friends and celebrities, 2016 was actually a banner friggin’ year for some of us personally, as I began addressing in Part 1 of this post.

July

We (me, Amanda Glaze, Bill Evans, Laura Reed) started July by submitting our evolution education book to the publisher.
http://evostudies.org/2016/09/evolution-education-in-the-american-south/

American Samoa

Then I joined Michaela Howells in American Samoa to conduct research on Zika and prenatal care access and utilization. I wrote about parts of it in recent blog posts for Anthropology News and a longer version on the Bama Anthro Blog Network. American Samoa is gorgeous and fascinating, and I took many many photos, scenic in some cases and interesting only to us in others. I posted some of the more generally notable ones in a Flickr album here and shared a few highlight below.

Oldest church in American Samoa (obviously renovated), which is in the village of Leone.

Oldest church in American Samoa (obviously renovated), which is in the village of Leone.

Michaela lived in American Samoa for 2 years while collecting data for her dissertation and knows Tutuila well. We were casing the western extreme for villages to potentially include in future research, and she was showing me the sights, including the oldest church in American Samoa, located in Leone.

Watching the sun set in the village of Taputima, American Samoa, July 2016.

Watching the sun set in the village of Taputima, American Samoa, July 2016.

On the way back, we stopped in Taputima, where she first lived during her two years there, to watch the sunset.

A surf board peeking over a wall near the village of Lauli'i, American Samoa, July 2016.

A surf board peeking over a wall near the village of Lauli’i, American Samoa, July 2016.

Another weekend, we went toward the eastern end.

Michaela Howells conducting interviews in the Office of Historic Preservation, American Samoa.

Michaela Howells conducting interviews in the Office of Historic Preservation, American Samoa.

We spent the weekdays collecting data in the Department of Health and worked closely with anthropologist David Herdrich, Director of the American Samoa Historic Preservation Office, but on the weekends we made the most of being in the South Pacific.

Michaela Howells and David Herdrich, viewed from inside a pillbox next to Pago Pago International Airport.

Michaela Howells and David Herdrich, viewed from inside a pillbox next to Pago Pago International Airport.

We went with David to snorkel the coral next to Pago Pago International Airport.

View from atop Mount Alava, Tutuila, American Samoa.

View from atop Mount Alava, Tutuila, American Samoa.

And hiked up Mount Alava in the mist (and walked back in the dark).

August

August is a celebration of Lynn. My birthday is August 6th (I would like an Apple watch), my boys are the 8th, and my wife Loretta is the 19th. I “surprised” my wife Loretta with a gathering at Grace Aberdean Habitat Alchemy. I actually had to tell her about it for logistic reasons, but then she pretended she didn’t know to preserve the experience.

Loretta in her new cowboy boots at her "surprise" birthday gathering at Grace Aberdean Habitat Alchemy, August 2016.

Loretta in her new cowboy boots at her “surprise” birthday gathering at Grace Aberdean Habitat Alchemy, August 2016.

In the meantime, I was pounding out grant proposals. This is tenure. I work even harder. Go figure.

Submitted TWO NSF proposals today (one w/ Michaela Howells–yes, we rock), got Gdog microchipped, & now off to get my broken replacement for a broken phone replaced. Whew! #fullfreakingday

Posted by Christopher Dana Lynn on Monday, August 15, 2016

No luck with the Greece proposal, but we are still awaiting word on the Samoa project. Fingers crossed!

HBERG was amazing this semester. We had more students than ever before & we super productive. In August, Greg Batchelder visited from the field. (Photo by Greg Batchelder)

HBERG was amazing this semester. We had more students than ever before & we super productive. In August, Greg Batchelder visited from the field. (Photo by Greg Batchelder)

HBERG was great this past fall. I had more students than ever before, including grad students Max Stein, Nick Roy, Monika Wanis, Greg Batchelder, Ashley Stewart, Juliann Friel, and Diana Simpson. I’m really thankful for the assistance they all provide to keep everything running smoothly and make us all look good. Max, Nick, and Monika ran things in HBERG, Greg provided inspiration and visited from Costa Rica, Ashley ran the “Anthropology is Elemental” service-learning course and outreach, and Juliann and Diana did a great job TAing “Introduction to Biological Anthropology” for me.

I emceed the annual Anthropology Department potlatch wearing my ie fataga & an Alabama Hawaiian shirt. Juliann Friel gifted my new grad student Nick Roy a framed photo of me to stare awkwardly at him throughout the year.

I emceed the annual Anthropology Department potlatch wearing my ie fataga & an Alabama Hawaiian shirt. Juliann Friel gifted my new grad student Nick Roy a framed photo of me to stare awkwardly at him throughout the year. Photo by Loretta Lynn.

I emceed the annual Anthropology Department potlatch for the second time. I was really excited to get a chance to wear my ie fataga and kukui beads from Samoa and to score an Alabama Hawaiian shirt from my friend Shelly Rosenzweig (I swear I plan to bring it back to you, Shelly. It’s hanging in my dining room waiting to be returned, but I like it so much, I keep “forgetting”). My 2nd year master’s student Juliann Friel introduced a ritual item for my students to circulate by giving Nick Roy a framed photo of me to stare at him all year. We’ll see if it makes it to next year or if Nick breaks and burns it in effigy!

September

In September, Michaela came to UA and gave a guest lecture for my primatology class, an Extemporaneous Talk for the UA Department of Anthropology.

Michaela tells my class the classic story of a macaque biting her in the ass, whereupon her asswound had to be appraised by Agustin Fuentes & future husband James Loudon.

Michaela tells my class the classic story of a macaque biting her in the ass, whereupon her asswound had to be appraised by Agustin Fuentes & future husband James Loudon.

Then we drove to Atlanta to meet with some colleagues at Emory and the CDC to consult on our Samoa research.

We stopped to hamsteak it up outside the Waffle House Museum in Atlanta. Yes, a Waffle House Museum. No, I don't know why.

We stopped to hamsteak it up outside the Waffle House Museum in Atlanta. Yes, a Waffle House Museum. No, I don’t know why.

October

In October, Katie Smith, who is another member of our virtual writing group, came up from Southern Miss to give a guest lecture for my primatology class on zoo primatology.

MABIG

I went to the Mid-Atlantic Bioanthropology Interest Group (MABIG) in Richmond, VA for the first time this year. It’s run by my new good friend Amy Rector, who I met via Michaela at SEEPS. As with any good conference, I walked away working on a new collaboration. Amy and I are working on a paper with Mandy Guitar about the benefits and approach to hosting conferences about evolution.

Amy Rector (blurred because of her frenetic energy) with her students (standing) and Michaela Howells at MABIG 2016, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, October 2016.

Amy Rector (blurred because of her frenetic energy) with her students (standing) and Michaela Howells at MABIG 2016, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, October 2016.

I’d started taking the free ballroom dance lessons through the Crimson Tide Ballroom Dancers in Tuscaloosa, so, while we were in Richmond, Michaela introduced me to swing dancing after MABIG by taking me to Jammin’ on the James. Below is a video segment clip of a “Jick and Jall” competition (“Jack and Jill” but gender blended) that took place while we were there. You can see us sitting off to the side on the right watching. I loved it so much, I promptly came back in time for the CTBD swing lesson then practiced my triple-step so much I ended up with extensor tendonitis. I’m still trying to heal up.

The next week, I took my biological anthropology and primatology students on our regular field trip to Birmingham Zoo.

Students from "Introduction to Biological Anthropology" and "Non-Human Primates" in front of the gibbon enclosure at Birmingham Zoo, October 2016.

Students from “Introduction to Biological Anthropology” and “Non-Human Primates” in front of the gibbon enclosure at Birmingham Zoo, October 2016.

This field trip is usually a highlight of the classes. Students have often not been to a zoo since they were a little kids and never had the opportunity to appreciate it with the perspective of someone educated about what they seeing.

This langur reminded me of something...I couldnt quite put my finger on it...

This langur reminded me of something…I couldnt quite put my finger on it…

Oh, right.

Oh, right.

My favorite holiday is also in October. I wish Halloween had a longer season, like Christmas. I love decorating the house. Halloween decorations should not be purchased. We go totally Southern gothic with whatever junk we find in the garage.

Our front porch for Halloween, October 2016.

Our front porch for Halloween, October 2016.

And good costumes take time. But, in all fairness, we were pretty busy. The weekend before Bailey performed as part of the 2016 Honors String Festival for the Alabama String Teachers Association. We took him to Birmingham for three days to work with a guest conductor, learn several pieces, then perform on Sunday. I really enjoyed driving him up there with the other kids, seeing them apply these amazing skills they’ve developed, and do this elaborate, sophisticated, culture thing. I am so proud.

Bailey playing standup bass at the 2016 ASTA Honors Strings Festival in Birmingham, AL.

Bailey playing standup bass at the 2016 ASTA Honors Strings Festival in Birmingham, AL.

This year Halloween was a bit of bummer because we didn’t have time to get our costumes together until the last minute and just winged stuff at the costume store for the most part. I pulled mine together from my closet in 15 minutes. It turned out okay since we didn’t have any parties to go to, but any occasion to wear a costume is one to be savored.

Halloween 2016: me, Lor, Jagger, Bailey, Lux, and friends Gus and Ry.

Halloween 2016: me, Lor, Jagger, Bailey, Lux, and friends Gus and Ry.

November

As stated in Part 1, 2016 was a banner year for HBERG, and in November the special issue of Annals of Anthropological Practice with two articles we co-authored about our research model and outreach were published.

HBERGers Monika Wanis, Isabella Rivera, and Ciarra Van Wegenen collecting saliva samples for our BREST study.

HBERGers Monika Wanis, Isabella Rivera, and Ciarra Van Wagenen collecting saliva samples for our BREST study.

For the past year, we’ve been trying to get our Belongingness and Religious Ecology Study Tuscaloosa (BREST) off the ground. The hold-up has been time to follow through with the bureaucracy. I’ll save the details for another blog post, but it’s a study I’m really excited about and moves our research in a seriously groundbreaking direction. At least I think so. And I love cool research that breaks ground and gets us lots of press. I am a media whore. No denying it.

Speaking of which, I was super-stoked that the print version of the American Journal of Human Biology with our article from March came out because they put a photo of mine on the cover!

Then, of course, shit got real. Shortly after the election, I hosted an ALLELE lecture by Joe Graves and blogged the intro I composed for it.
http://evostudies.org/2016/11/a-world-famous-african-american-scientist-puts-the-presidential-election-in-perspective-i-am-not-surprised-at-all/

And then I blogged again a little more about his visit.
http://evostudies.org/2016/11/huge-service-to-the-university-and-the-community-more-generally/

Later in the month, I escaped reality to be with thousands of other knee-jerk liberal anthropologists at the American Anthropological Association annual conference and commune about our collective despair. I blogged about the value of professional social networking at conferences.
http://evostudies.org/2016/12/building-professional-social-networks-through-the-american-anthropological-association-annual-meeting/

Right after the AAA conference was Thanksgiving, when we go to Indiana to see my family. I blogged about putting in a concerted effort to be more social and, thus, a happier person.
http://evostudies.org/2016/12/holiday-socializing-practicing-a-biological-imperative/

Students in "Non-Human Primates" must come up with activities to help us remember their lessons, and I like to set a good example and participate. This one was about gorillas, knuckle-walking, and, apparently, carrying carrots in my mouth. (Photo by Sierra Lawson)

Students in “Non-Human Primates” must come up with activities to help us remember their lessons, and I like to set a good example and participate. This one was about gorillas, knuckle-walking, and, apparently, carrying carrots in my mouth. (Photo by Sierra Lawson)

During the last week of class, students in my primatology class did their last “Primate Biographies” on gorillas. It was really excellent, and I always like to set a good example by being the first to participate and loosen everyone up. Here I am knuckle-walking and carrying food to my friends.

December

In December, classes ended, and my sabbatical officially started. That doesn’t mean I stopped working, just no more teaching until next fall. Indeed, I submitted a grant proposal as soon as I finished grading, then finished the spring 2016 Anthropology Department newsletter, then finished the 2015-16 Department assessment (these latter two I was a little late on). Then I blogged about my sabbatical plans.
http://evostudies.org/2016/12/sabbatical-is-here/

I started one more blog post for the end of the year but didn’t get very far. I realize I sometimes think in blog posts. As I Christmas shopped for my family, I took photos of things I wanted to blog about and was composing in my mind. Needless to say, that’s as far as it got. So I will suffice with a few parting photos for the year.

Inspired by Cara Ocobock, I made this awesome Yule log cake. (Photo by Donna Eis)

Inspired by Cara Ocobock, I made this awesome Yule log cake. (Photo by Donna Eis)

I went to Midnight Mass at Mount Carmel with Uncle Ernie, 12/25/16.

I went to Midnight Mass at Mount Carmel with Uncle Ernie, 12/25/16.

As Jessica Muzzo points out, this is the most hipster score for Christmas. So psyched to play with it! (Photo by Loretta Lynn)

As Jessica Muzzo points out, this is the most hipster score for Christmas. So psyched to play with it! (Photo by Loretta Lynn)

Mark Eis & I went on our annual winter hike. This year to Illinois Mountain in Highland, NY.

Mark Eis & I went on our annual winter hike. This year to Illinois Mountain in Highland, NY.

We went on our annual ice skating excursion at the Mid-Hudson Civic Center on New Year's Eve. (Photo by Loretta Lynn)

We went on our annual ice skating excursion at the Mid-Hudson Civic Center on New Year’s Eve. (Photo by Loretta Lynn)

And then, of course, the Tide rolled over another team to put themselves in the championship game.

It was a wonderful year in which only one (really really) bad thing happened. It does seem to have wiped out many good things, but I refuse to give it that much power. Consistent with that, I anticipate 2017 to be fucking amazing.

See you on the other side (of the year)!

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Posted in American Anthropological Association, Biological Anthropology, Biological Anthropology Section of AAA, Christopher Lynn, Mid-Atlantic Bioanthropology Interest Group, Primates, Thanksgiving | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on #2016Highlights Month-by-Month: Part 2

#2016Highlights Month-by-Month: Part 1

Though the end of 2016 was miserable, most of the year was awesome, and it’s important that we have a little perspective. At my house, we have a dinner ritual called “Good Thing/Bad Thing” or GTBT. We each take turns saying one good thing that happened during the day and one bad thing. Each person only gets one of each at each turn, no one can comment on anyone else’s GTBT, and a bad thing can’t be directed at complaining about someone else at the table. It’s allowed to have good things without bad things but not vice versa. The point of the activity is to avoid the family trap of just bitching about people and things. So I’m going to make sure I end the year by highlighting stuff that happened and that I have at least as many good things to report as bad things. Frankly, I think more good stuff happened. Most of the bad stuff is piddly, embarrassing, and nothing I really want to be sharing with you people. No offense.

January

What the heck happened in January? I’m drawing a total blank. I went almost a year between blog posts this year, so I’ve lost track of many things. Fortunately, I started using Google Photos to back up photos from all my devices around then, so I can relive the year through photos.

Actually, I’ll start in December. The ALLELE series hosted my good friend and co-author Dr. Becky Burch for a talk on “The Chemistry of Semen.” Becky and I came out of the same lab at the University of Albany, and her research on semen is amazing. In particular, I like the feminist perspective she brings to the research to give it, in my opinion, credibility within the very fraught field of evolutionary psychology.

Rebecca Burch | ALLELE Series from UA College of Arts & Sciences on Vimeo.

January was marked by family landmarks. My son Bailey got braces. Getting braces was a big deal for me as a kid. A big developmental marker.

And he looks really friggin’ cool.

February

SEEPS Inaugural Meeting

The inaugural Southeastern Evolutionary Perspectives Society (SEEPS) conference took place over Darwin Day weekend (12-14).

The first SEEPS crew, February 13, 2016.

The first SEEPS crew, February 13, 2016.

I hosted it in Tuscaloosa and think it was quite a success. So much so that we’re doing it there again in 2017. Evolutionary anthropologist Dean Falk was the keynote speaker.

Me with Dean Falk at the SEEPS keynote banquet, February 12, 2016.

Me with Dean Falk at the SEEPS keynote banquet, February 12, 2016.

March

Since I study religion, commitment, and cooperation as much as evolution, I love a good ritual celebration. A few years ago, Mount Olive Baptist Church in Coker, AL started hosting a drive-through Easter celebration with the Stations of the Cross, so we try to go once a year.

The drive-through Stations of the Cross Easter performance at Mount Olive Baptist Church in Coker, AL.

The drive-through Stations of the Cross Easter performance at Mount Olive Baptist Church in Coker, AL.

American Journal of Human Biology published our article on tattooing and immune response (“Tattooing to “Toughen up”: Tattoo experience and secretory immunoglobulin A”). online ahead of print.

At the end of the month, the Religious Studies Department hosted an ALLELE lecture by William “Lee” McCorkle. It was great to meet Lee, as we have a lot in common research-wise, and he’s also a rock guy.

Lee McCorkle braved the raging storm to give an ALLELE lecture on the cognitive science of religion in March.

Lee McCorkle braved the raging storm to give an ALLELE lecture on the cognitive science of religion in March.

Lately we’ve been messaging to try to hook him up with another type of gig, as his band just finished up an album and are going on tour.

April

HBA/AAPA Conference in Atlanta

April is a big conference time, when the Human Biology Association and American Association of Physical Anthropologists (and 2-3 other related societies) meet.

HBERGers (clockwise from front) Ashley Daugherty, Caity Walker, Nick Roy, Kayleigh Meighan, Jessica Muzzo, & Connor Fasel at AAPA in Atlanta, GA.

HBERGers (clockwise from front) Ashley Daugherty, Caity Walker, Nick Roy, Kayleigh Meighan, Jessica Muzzo, & Connor Fasel at AAPA in Atlanta, GA.

This year was in nearby Atlanta, so we took a crew of students from my Human Behavioral Ecology Research Group.

With friends Mia Gallo, Kyrie Nelder, and Nat Graham my former undergrad!).

At the HBA meeting in Atlanta, with friends Mia Gallo, Kyrie Nelder, and Nat Graham (my former undergrad!) from UAlbany.

I also got to see old friends from grad school of fellow Larry Schell students at the University at Albany.

Me my good friend writing group partner Cara Ocobock at AAPA.

Me my good friend writing group partner Cara Ocobock at AAPA.

And newer friends who I see almost every week online (in the Human Biology Writing Group we started after an HBA meeting in 2012) but only a few times a year in person. My friend Cara was cagey around my UAlbany friends and adviser because she was up for a job there and later got hired. She’s now right next door to Larry, and her lab is right across the hall for my old TA office.

At the AAPA meeting in Atlanta with Twitter (& now real life) friends (clockwise from front-center) Caitlin Schrein, Alexander Georgiev, Marc Kissel, Austin Lawrence, me, Julienne Rutherford. (Photo by Caitlin Schrein)

At the AAPA meeting in Atlanta with Twitter (& now real life) friends (clockwise from front-center) Caitlin Schrein, Alexander Georgiev, Marc Kissel, Austin Lawrence, me, Julienne Rutherford. (Photo by Caitlin Schrein)

And friends I initially met blogging and on Twitter but who I now look forward to reconnecting with in person at the meetings.

Lee Berger gifts Alabama Natural History Museum Bill Bomar a Homo naledi cast at his ALLELE/ANHM co-sponsored talk.

Lee Berger gifts Alabama Natural History Museum Bill Bomar a Homo naledi cast at his ALLELE/ANHM co-sponsored talk.

Since we knew world famous paleoanthropologist Lee Berger was in country to give a big series of talks at the AAPA meeting, we invited him to UA to give a special extra ALLELE lecture organized and hosted by the Alabama Natural History Museum. And when I say “we,” I mean Bill Bomar, Museum Director, who was in the anthropology club at Georgia Southern as an undergrad! I keep telling students to get involved and the connections they make now will pay off down the road. Mm hmm.

One of my favorite class activities in "Evolution for Everyone" is when friend artist Charlotte Wrgzynowski gives a guest lecture teachers naturalist drawing.

One of my favorite class activities in “Evolution for Everyone” is when friend artist Charlotte Wegryznowski gives a guest lecture teachers naturalist drawing.

Since I’m on sabbatical this spring, I won’t be teaching “Evolution for Everyone” for a few years. But for the past few years, I’ve had Charlotte Wegryznowski teach a lecture on naturalist drawing, which is the highlight for me. I love and miss drawing regularly.

May

I was so busy doing other writing that 2016 was my worst blogging year in a while. That was a shame because it was also my most active year, personally and professionally. At the end of the spring semester, we did some family things, like go to the African Village in America. It’s a self-styled museum, created by an eccentric in Birmingham in his yard and other properties that he owns on his street. We weren’t able to go in, but we walked around the amazing property and talked to neighbors. They weren’t so stoked on it. It’s quite the roadside attraction.

For Mothers Day, we visited the eccentric African Village in America In Birmingham, AL.

For Mothers Day, we visited the eccentric African Village in America In Birmingham, AL.

Alabama-Greece Initiative

In May, I spent an amazing week in Thessaloniki, Greece with the Alabama-Greece Initiative. This was really the beginning of living the anthropology career I’ve dreamed about.

Great memories from Thessaloniki — with Tatiana Summers, Luoheng Han, Vaia Touna and Robert Olin in Thessaloníki, Greece. (Photo by Luoheng Han).

Great memories from Thessaloniki — with Tatiana Summers, Associate Dean Luoheng Han, Vaia Touna and Dean Robert Olin in Thessaloníki, Greece. (Photo by Luoheng Han).

I have to thank my Dean and Associate Deans of Arts and Sciences for the support they give our programs and opportunities they create.

The nearby market during a week in Thessoloniki, Greece with the UA-Greece Initiative, May 2016.

The nearby market during a week in Thessoloniki, Greece with the UA-Greece Initiative, May 2016.

The Greece Initiative is a collaboration with Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (AUTh), where we got a fantastic tour of the Greek statuary archives in the Anthropology Department.

A great statuette of Athena from the teaching archives of the Anthropology Department in the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.

A great statuette of Athena from the teaching archives of the Anthropology Department in the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.

AUTh also has some amazing hominid skulls found in the region that we were shown in the Geology Department. The Petralona Skull is a 160-200,000 year old that has been classified variously as Homo heidelbergensis, Homo erectus, and Homo sapiens neanderthalensis.

We got to see the real Petralona skull (160-200kyo) in the Geology Dept in Aristotle University.

We got to see the real Petralona skull (160-200kyo) in the Geology Dept in Aristotle University.

We were also shown Ouranopithcus macedoniensis, which is a late Miocene ape, probably related or ancestral to gorillas.

Ouranopithecus macedoniensis, a late Miocene ape.

Ouranopithecus macedoniensis, a late Miocene ape.

Part of the trip included a tour of the Archaeological Museum and site at Pella, where Alexander the Great was born and his father Phillip II ruled from.

Sex acts depicted on the inside of ancient Greek pottery from the museum at Pella, birthplace of Alexander the Great.

Sex acts depicted on the inside of ancient Greek pottery from the museum at Pella, birthplace of Alexander the Great.

Drawing of the sex acts depicted on the inside of ancient Greek pottery from the museum at Pella, birthplace of Alexander the Great.

Drawing of the sex acts depicted on the inside of ancient Greek pottery from the museum at Pella.

Drawing of the sex acts depicted on the inside of ancient Greek pottery from the museum at Pella, birthplace of Alexander the Great.

Another drawing of the sex acts depicted on the inside of ancient Greek pottery from the museum at Pella.

But we didn’t need to travel to see ancient ruins of course. It’s Greece. They are everywhere.

The ancient Greek market in Thessaloniki.

The ancient Greek market in Thessaloniki.

Upon return from Greece, I spent a month banging out two articles about HBERG and our outreach program, which were published in November. I’m super proud of both and blogged about the HBERG model for Anthropology News and the outreach program here earlier this month.

June

Yellowstone Park, Mount Rushmore, Badlands, Little Bighorn

My parents took us on an amazing family vacation in June. We packed up into a van together (7 people, 2 chihuahuas, 1 husky) and went to the Badlands, Little Bighorn, Mount Rushmore, Bozeman, and Yellowstone Park. I stuck a bunch of photos in this Flickr album but below are a few highlights.

Why do they call them The Badlands, you ask? Behold. Yet majestic.

Why do they call them The Badlands, you ask? Behold. Yet majestic.

U.S. soldier grave markers pepper Little Bighorn National Monument.

U.S. soldier grave markers pepper Little Bighorn National Monument.

Jagger and I at Mount Rushmore.

Jagger and I at Mount Rushmore.

We spent a few days in Bozeman, MT, which is just lovely. Very arty, lovely, and, um, well, white. And I don’t mean all the snow, since it was summer, which makes it a little painful to like. But there you have it.

Gallifrey surveying the dog park in Bozeman, MT.

Gallifrey surveying the dog park in Bozeman, MT.

The dog park was so big I couldn’t let poor Gallifrey off the leash anyway (have you ever tried to catch a husky who doesn’t want to be caught? he thinks you’re just playing rough).

The dinosaur fossils at Museum of the Rockies are an evolutionist (& kid) dream.

The dinosaur fossils at Museum of the Rockies are an evolutionist (& kid) dream.

The Museum of the Rockies is a great dinosaur fossil museum. There were several exhibits on the work of Mary Schweitzer, who we had as an ALLELE speaker several years ago. That was exciting for me to good out on and pontificate to the kids about. They love that too.

In this cage we have the cerebral paleontologist in an enriched habitat — at Museum of the Rockies.

In this cage we have the cerebral paleontologist in an enriched habitat — at Museum of the Rockies.

My parents rented a cabin in Pray, MT, from which we ventured out to go fly fishing and into Yellowstone Park.

View from our cabin in Pray, MT.

View from our cabin in Pray, MT.

Yellowstone Park is truly spectacular. It blew my mind. Now I understand why it was the world’s first national park and why the U.S. government saw fit to preserves thousands of acres in an era characterized by manifest destiny, settlement, and development.

Being out of the car having a big guy look right at is definitely a little intimidating.

Being out of the car having a big guy look right at is definitely a little intimidating.

It is, as expected, the most touristy park I’ve ever been in—has its own towns!—and simultaneously the wildest. And we barely scratched the surface. We definitely need to go back for more.

2016 was so action-packed that I can’t fit it all in one pithy blog post. 2016 did not suck. Some aspects of it were awful. Truly awful. But others were wonderful.

Happy New Year to everyone. Buck up. Time to rock 2017. After I finish “Part 2.”

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Posted in American Anthropological Association, American Association of Physical Anthropologists, Anthropology, Biological Anthropology, Biological Anthropology Section of AAA, Christopher Lynn, Conferences, Evolution Conference, Human Biology Association | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on #2016Highlights Month-by-Month: Part 1

Sabbatical is Here!

Have I started relaxing yet? Everyone asks me this. Do y’all not know me? We just arrived at my in-laws for the holiday, & I’m already thinking about how to fill my days. I don’t relax well. But I am excited.

I started by submitting a grant application! Yeah! Fun times! This year I published an article on a preliminary study we conducted in Alabama on immune response to tattooing. We received tons of press (the best being the Jezebel piece, “How One Study Produced a Bunch of Untrue Headlines About Tattoos Strengthening Your Immune System”), but we really need to repeat the study with a larger sample of people who get more tattoos and have more general health stress. So we’re trying to get funds to repeat this study at our field site in American Samoa as follows:

TATTOOING AND IMMUNE RESPONSE IN AMERICAN SAMOA
Abstract: The proposed study tests the hypothesis that tattooing may provide an inoculation effect, priming the immune system and preparing it for pathogenic exposures. I propose to test this inoculation hypothesis of tattooing in American Samoa, which has an extensive tattooing history and high infectious but low immune-related disease rates. Tattooing has been practiced across the world as a rite of passage that supposedly protects the body. However, there are few studies of the mechanisms by which this may work. The proposed study is important in exploring how a cultural practice that seems counterintuitive to promoting health may be protective and has implications for prevention and treatment of autoimmune disease.

We’d like to get down to Tisa’s Tattoo Festival to collect data when people are getting traditional tattoos by master tattooists like this:

After submitting the grant proposal, I jumped in the van and drove the family up to the Hudson Valley, where my EvoS career began, for our annual visit to my in-laws. Speaking of which, a few years ago I came back and gave this talk, which is the subject of the book I’ll be writing on this sabbatical:

http://newpaltz.mediasite.suny.edu/Mediasite/Play/bf12723bc7434681bd88cfea02790be41d?catalog=e5f4c6f4-0f8f-49fa-ab84-ee314450ea83

Here were are, rolling out of Tuscaloosa:

(Photo by Loretta Lynn)

(Photo by Loretta Lynn)

We made great time, but here’s me on Day Two:

And one from my wife:

Gallifrey is super stoked to be here. He is born to the snow. It’s good he lives in Alabama.

Me and Gallifrey upon arrival in NY. (Photo by Loretta Lynn)

Me and Gallifrey upon arrival in NY. (Photo by Loretta Lynn)

Next week, I’m hoping to see some friends in the area. After we head back, I head to Wilmington, NC to work on an NSF grant proposal (yay, more relaxing sabbatical fun!).

In February, I host SEEPS 2017 (see me relaxing?). Speaking of SEEPS, check out the promo video Hannah Tytus made for us: 

SEEPS Annual Conference 2017 from Hannah on Vimeo.

In March, I’m hoping to “swing thru the U.K.” (because that’s what you do on sabbatical—swing thru foreign countries, #likeaboss) and look into setting up an EvoS study abroad program in affiliation with the UA in Oxford program. Check out the course on Charles Darwin and Jack the Ripper our very own Erik Peterson (who is heading up our “Evolution for Everyone” course this coming spring) is teaching next summer!

Then I will head to Madagascar to set up a cultural exchange we’ve been developing for our Anthropology is Elemental program with grant funding from the Wenner Gren Foundation. We’re partnering there with Dustin Eirdosh and Susan Hanisch of Big Red Earth and EvoKids.

Either before leaving or upon returning, I hope to be giving a few talks at UNCW to promote the new Evolution Education in the American South book. Then Michaela Howells and I hope to be giving a talk at Georgia Southern about our study of the influence of Zika on prenatal care access and utilization in American Samoa (thanks to Jessica Carew Kraft for writing “Cultural Factors Complicate Zika Prevention in American Samoa” for NBCNews.com about our work there). In late March or early April, I’ll also be going to my alma mater, the University at Albany, and to UConn and Binghamton University to give talks on the Evolution Education in the American South volume.

In April, I’m involved with several presentations at the Human Biology Association and American Association of Physical Anthropologists annual conferences in NOLA. Michaela and I will present on the Zika study at the HBA, then (cross-fingers, because these are as yet unconfirmed) I hope to be giving a talk on religious commitment signaling for an Invited Joint AAPA/HBA session on signaling theory organized by Michael Muehlenbein. We should have a host of HBERGers representin’ with talks and posters as well!

HBERGers collecting their own saliva samples to learn the protocol for our BREST study.

HBERGers collecting their own saliva samples to learn the protocol for our BREST study.

Afterward, if my wife has not divorced me yet for doing so much traveling while she takes care of the kids, I’ll head down to Costa Rica to visit my PhD student Greg Batchelder in the field, give him some support, check out his life with the Bribri (which Greg has been blogging about a lot here), and try to set up another wing of our Anthropology is Elemental outreach.

Finally, though it’s technically after sabbatical, I plan to get back to American Samoa with Michaela in July to collect data for our tattoo and Zika/prenatal care projects.

American Samoa is a hard place to work, but we endure.

American Samoa is a hard place to work, but we endure.

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Posted in American Association of Physical Anthropologists, Anthropology, Biological Anthropology, Christopher Lynn, Education, Evolution & Pop Culture, Evolution Outreach, Human Biology Association, Sabbatical, Southeastern Evolutionary Perspectives Society | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Sabbatical is Here!

Holiday Socializing: Practicing a Biological Imperative

This holiday season I’m putting a concerted into being more social. I spend a fair amount of time thinking about the irony of teaching about the human social imperative and the struggle many of us have to be social. I know a lot of other anthropologists who have similar issues, in which we are seen as being very socially inclined but must practice it as an art, indeed, one that we spend our careers studying. Socializing generally makes me feel better about myself and overall lighter and more fulfilled, yet my perpetual tendency is to withdraw. Sometimes withdrawing is a relief, when I need to gather myself, but it also often feel like hiding a rotting. The winter holidays are a particularly difficult time, which I used to attribute to the weather, though I’m not sure that is valid anymore, since it’s generally fairly warm in the South, where I live now.

My cousin Chelsa and her family stopped by my sister's house for a visit and some Thanksgiving dinner.

My cousin Chelsa and her family stopped by my sister’s house for a visit and some Thanksgiving dinner, 11/24/16.

Validating my effort, I feel really good about the time I got to spend with family and friends over the Thanksgiving holiday. We drove to Indiana the day before Thanksgiving, in time for my kids to make pies with my mom. I was pleased we made it there in plenty of time for that. My sister and mother did great jobs on Thanksgiving dinner, and my sister impressed us again by toughing it through cooking and serving with a medical malady that had her in for emergency dental surgery the day after (last year was a kidney stone in the ER in the middle of the night but back home in time to finish the turkey). And it was great to to see my cousin Chelsa and her family for a few hours on Thanksgiving day as they made the family rounds.

With my cousin, Chelsa Lynn-Echols, visiting Granny Sue in the nursing home, Knightsville, IN, 12/6/16.

With my cousin, Chelsa Lynn-Echols, visiting Granny Sue in the nursing home, Knightsville, IN, 11/25/16.

On Friday, we went to see my grandmother in the nursing home down near Brazil, IN. Chelsa rode down in the car with me, my wife, and kids. Chelsa is 12 years younger than me, and, until her father died a few years ago, I hadn’t seen much of her in many many years. It has been good to reconnect with her these past few Thanksgivings, but this was the longest conversation we had ever had. We talked about our fathers (who were brothers) and the different perspectives we had on many of the same stories of our childhoods. It was really really great, and I’m so pleased to have had the opportunity to learn how much I like my cousin and enjoy hanging out with her. Our grandmother has Alzheimer’s, and we have very different relationships with her, which was also interesting and something I had never spent any time thinking about.

Chelsa hitting the bag at SRG Boxing N Personal Training, 11/26/16.

Chelsa hitting the bag at SRG Boxing N Personal Training, 11/26/16.

Chelsa is a personal trainer, so I invited myself along to her workout on Saturday, which was near my parents’ house, then got her to show me some workouts I could do to rehab my body after my foot surgery last year threw my gait off.

Chelsa and the badass women she works out with at SRG, 11/26/16.

Chelsa and the badass women she works out with at SRG, 11/26/16.

I just like this photo a lot. SRG, 11/26/16.

I just like this photo a lot. SRG, 11/26/16.

I spent the afternoon watching the Ohio State v. Michigan game, then the first half of the Iron Bowl with my dad before heading over to see my friend, Elizabeth Rowe. Of course, Alabama scored both winning touchdowns in the 3rd quarter while I was in the car, so I effectively missed the best part of the stupid game. But it was great to see Elizabeth and meet her boyfriend John. Elizabeth is one of the original members of the Human Biology Writing Group I am part of (started as well with Michaela Howells and Hannah Wilson and currently comprising me, Michaela, Cara Ocobock, Marc Kissel, and Katie Smith). We met at a workshop for early career scientists to improve our writing productivity at a Human Biology Association in 2012 in Knoxville, TN. Elizabeth has been living in my hometown for a few years, but this is the first holiday I’ve managed to get together with her, and I’m so happy I did. John made some yummy pizza, and we sat in the kitchen eating and talking and, before I knew it, 3 or 4 hours had passed. I can’t wait to do it again and bring them to my parents house or go out on the town with our whole families.

With Elizabeth Rowe and John Herbert in their kitchen, Brownsburg, IN, 11/26/16.

With Elizabeth Rowe and John Herbert in their kitchen, Brownsburg, IN, 11/26/16.

Holiday socializing, mission accomplished. And satisfying that biological imperative does feel better. Huh.

Socializing with this guy comes easy. He's weird at my parents though and doesn't like to come in from the garage. He finally came in though and sat tentatively here by the couch, looking cute. He has fuzzy kitty paws, doesn't he? (Gallifrey, 11/23/16)

Socializing with this guy comes easy. He’s weird at my parents though and doesn’t like to come in from the garage. He finally came in though and sat tentatively here by the couch, looking cute. He has fuzzy kitty paws, doesn’t he? (Gallifrey, 11/23/16)

 

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Building professional social networks through the American Anthropological Association annual meeting

A few years ago, I’d all but decided I wasn’t going to go to the American Anthropological Association main conference anymore. This was the year it was in San Francisco (111th Annual Meeting, 2012). Ironically, that was a memorable conference. I had several good meals in the Vietnamese neighborhood nearby (it was hosted in the Tenderloin—mm, bahn mis), was part of a great neuroanthropology session convened by Daniel Lende and Greg Downey (and out of which, ultimately, a publication about my lab’s teaching model came out in Anthropology Now), met Sonya Pritzker, who we ultimately wooed to Alabama to become a faculty member in my department, and spent at least two whole days walking around and exploring San Francisco with Max Stein and my best friend from graduate school, Courtney Kurlanska (Courtney likes to remind me about how it appeared that I was courteously pulling her out of the rain when in fact I was pulling her into a spot where I could see the a football game across a street through a sports bar window in which a bizarre set of losses actually led to Alabama getting back into the BCS Championship game to beat LSU).

Among the joys of anthropology, traveling, & conferencing is food, natch. Dinner at The Bachelor Farmer, Mpls, MN. Photo by Michaela Howells.

Among the joys of anthropology, traveling, & conferencing is food, natch. Dinner at The Bachelor Farmer, Mpls, MN. Photo by Michaela Howells.

My main complaint was that there were not enough biocultural anthropology talks or sessions or things where I obviously felt like I fit in. What I failed to recognize was that I was already doing the things these conferences are really for—building my network. But then the next year in Chicago, there were several big biocultural sessions that I felt spoke to me, and Katie MacKinnon, Julienne Rutherford, Robin Nelson, and others reached out to me as a fellow Tweeter and blogger and made me feel welcome. I realized I’d found my people, and things clicked. I’m now going the other direction and trying to get MORE involved in the organization to promote the need for the AAA to better represent four-fieldness, and I feel like part of a cohort of others doing the same.

AAA 2016 Roomies: Marc Kissel, Michaela Howells, Chris Lynn. Photo by Michaela Howells.

AAA 2016 Roomies: Marc Kissel, Michaela Howells, Chris Lynn. Photo by Michaela Howells.

This year, the meeting was held in Minneapolis, MN, and I attended Wednesday, 11/16 through Sunday, 11/20. I shared a room with Michaela Howells and Marc Kissel, who are on the executive committee for the Biological Anthropology Section (BAS) of the AAA. So I tagged along with them to as many events as possible and tried to insinuate myself. Agustin Fuentes has been chosen as chair of next year’s AAA meeting and determined the theme to be “Anthropology Matters” and hosted a get-together in his suite to gather ideas. I think anthropologists have often felt embattled, but for the past 8 years, we have had a U.S. president whose mother was an anthropologist (I shared a bit on this a few weeks ago). I felt the anthropological perspective was implicit in Obama’s worldview and approach to politics and leadership. However, that has changed dramatically (and painfully), and there is urgency to explicitly demonstrate our relevance. The world does need us, and we need to articulate why.

In the Anthropology Dept at the University of Alabama, Lynn Funkhouser and I have developed a fantastic elementary (and middle) school outreach program at Alabama that conveys why anthropology matters. The opportunity to convey an anthropological perspective and influence humans to think about and appreciate diversity is most salient when they are young, before they self-select (in part) for their post-secondary lives. We rarely reach these kids, so most anthropological perspective is taught to largely upper middle-class white kids who go to college and chose to take anthropology courses (and the same is true of evolution courses, since this blog is about evolution—though evolution is one of the foundational theories of anthropology, so when I talk about anthropology, I imply evolution as well). Lynn and I and our students and colleagues have developed a model for teaching anthropology to elementary school students that we administer through a service-learning course to a few local schools, which we’ve received Wenner Gren funding to expand and just published an article about in Annals of Anthropological Practice.

BASAA executive committee dinner that I was allowed to tag along to (thanks, Michaela!). Clockwise from left: Marc Kissel (not pictured---sorry, I couldn't back up enough & clipped you), Rachel Caspari, Milford Wolfpoff, Cathy Willermet, Sang-Hee Lee, Jim McKenna, Andrea Eller, Jim's wife (sorry! name escapes), Melanie Beasley, Karen Rosenberg, Agustin Fuentes, Michaela Howells. Dinner at 102 Eatery.

BASAA executive committee dinner that I was allowed to tag along to (thanks, Michaela!). Clockwise from left: Marc Kissel (not pictured—sorry, I couldn’t back up enough & clipped you), Rachel Caspari, Milford Wolfpoff, Cathy Willermet, Sang-Hee Lee, Jim McKenna, Andrea Eller, Joanne Mack, Melanie Beasley, Karen Rosenberg, Agustin Fuentes, Michaela Howells. Dinner at 102 Eatery.

I was pleased to be able to share our ideas for next year’s conference and to have them so well received. The next day, these ideas came up at an executive lunch and then again at the business meeting, which was open to all members. Agustin, Michaela, and Marc urged me to share our programs ideas in more detail with the entire BAS membership in attendance, which, again, was well received (and also includes the upcoming Kids Evolutionary Perspectives Society pre-conference!). I talked to BAS president Rachel Caspari and BAS web manager Andrea Eller about it in more detail during the reception and to others about coordinating an executive session (contact us if you’re interested or have ideas!). Afterward, I was lucky to be invited to join the executive committee for dinner afterward and discuss these things further, as well as catch up on shared interests and hear several fantastic war stories from Milford Wolfpoff, Jim McKenna, Karen Rosenberg, Agustin, Michaela, and others (Sang-Hee Lee took several good photos that she posted to the BASAA Facebook group, which I encourage y’all to join).

On Wednesday, between these events, was a humbling interjection by keynote Melissa Harris Perry. She is not an anthropologist, but I think that’s good, as we needed some outside voice to give us a shake, I think. Or me. I needed a shake. The message I took away was, ‘White liberals, stop acting so surprised about the election. If anyone had bothered to do a cross-tabulation of female voters in the U.S., you would know that white women vote Republican. Why would the revelation that Trump is a pussy-grabber cause them to change their minds? The only surprise was that Trump got caught on camera saying it. The reality is that almost every woman in the world has had her pussy grabbed and had to deal with it because it’s behavior we all ignore or perpetrate. Many women are married or related to pussy-grabbing men and protect them and apologize for or defend their behavior on a daily basis. We’ve probably all grabbed a pussy, ass, or boob without permission. What does our culture imply about this? That it’s OK. It’s not, but we’re all reacting instead of acting.’ Oof. But yeah.

On Thursday, I was supposed to have lunch with Sidney Greenfield, whose wonderful book Spirits with Scalpels is one of the best sources out there related to the neuroanthropological work I do. Unfortunately, he wasn’t feeling well and couldn’t attend the meetings at all, but he asked me to chair a session, show two short films, and read a paper for him for the Society for Senior Anthropologists. The session was on the work of Phil Singer and Greenfield and their efforts to document the process and thoughts of anthropologists who are over 80 years old about their impending death. Although it sounds rather heavy and macabre, it wasn’t. The overarching theme was that people don’t necessarily become preoccupied with thinking about or preparing for their own deaths—most of them seem to continue thinking about work and anthropology all the way till the end. Though a few of the interviewees had recently died, including Phil Singer, which added a sobering element to the session, the message overall was very validating and hopeful. I was glad I could be part of it.

There were several other highlights of the conference that I’ll highlight with Tweets and photos, but I will also summarize them here. I met a few prospective graduate students, which is exciting, as I need to replace the amazing work Max Stein has been doing in my lab. Max is the lead author on another AAP paper that just came out about how we do things (in an excellent special issue compiled by Toni Copeland and Francois Dengah), and he has been instrumental as lab and project manager this year. But he should soon have his PhD in hand and be ‘out there,’ as it were, hopefully with a job in hand (or you should be contacting him if you have a biocultural position opening, because he is awesome).

A row of excellent mustaches and shoes. Photo courtesy Michaela Howells.

A row of excellent mustaches and shoes . Photo courtesy Michaela Howells.

Courtney and I had our annual date (though I missed last year because my grandmother died and I was at her funeral), but we forgot to get a selfie together! We hung with some other UAlbany alumni, braved the yucky Mpls. snow (OK, it melted in a half hour, but I was only wearing canvas shoes) to go have dinner at a local Vietnamese place (with, apparently, everyone else attending the conference), then met up with Francois Dengah and Max Stein for a bit more hanging before calling it an evening. In the process, I realized what The Replacements song “Skyway” was about, after walking through it for several days. Perhaps two other people in attendance appreciated my revelation.

Over the course of Friday and Saturday there were three excellent biocultural sessions convened by Morgan Hoke, including one in which Michaela presented on our work this past summer in American Samoa. In the middle of that, Sonya and I convened a session on biocultural anthropology and linguistics with us, Daniel Lende, Avery McNeece, Mandy Guitar and Sabina Perrino with Jim Wilce and Carol Worthman as discussants.

I thought it went great. Sonya says the editor of Ethos is interested in a special issue about the session. I met a few people with further interest in the work, including Josh Brahinsky, a postdoc in Tanya Luhrmann’s group. We talked after about future collaboration possibilities, which I find exciting. Then there was a BAS-sponsored networking workshop for students organized by Michaela (great photos of that event here) that I was supposed to participate in, but I went to the Zika Interest Group and Roundtables instead, to make sure Michaela and I could get involved with that for our work in American Samoa. Those were VERY helpful.

I also met with several publishers while there to pitch the book I’ll be writing while on sabbatical next semester. It was disheartening but not surprising to hear how much marketing considerations want us to narrow our focus and put us in boxes, while in the biocultural sessions there was explicit commentary on breaking down disciplinary boundaries. After working in music distribution and schlepping music to stores by appeal to genres, this is an obvious intersection of idealism and logistic practicality. However, I do feel that if the AAA wants to represent itself as four-field, the book editors’ narrow focus on cultural anthropology is a BIG problem.

Despite the issue with editors, I got some good books in the book room on the premise that I might someday teach a course that might someday use this or that book. On the other hand, Michaela got this excellent bib, modeled here by her anthro dog extraordinaire Uli, which she sent me when I asked her for relevant photos.

Despite the issue with editors, I got some good books in the book room on the premise that I might someday teach a course that might someday use this or that book. On the other hand, Michaela got this excellent bib, modeled here by her anthro dog extraordinaire Uli, which she sent me when I asked her for relevant photos.

For us, the conference wrapped up with an unfortunately unpublicized and, thus, underattended talk by Frans de Waal. It was mostly the same talk I’ve seen previously, but he’s still one of the best ALLELE lectures we’ve ever had and does a great job articulating a clear message to educated lay audiences and selling a compelling idea about human empathy.

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Posted in American Anthropological Association, Anthropology, Biological Anthropology Section of AAA, Christopher Lynn, Conferences | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Building professional social networks through the American Anthropological Association annual meeting

How to Make the Most of Guest Speakers or, Dinner with Ron Numbers

I wrote this post last fall but never got around to finishing & posting it. It’s dated but has a few valid points still worth putting out there.

I always tell my students that I get more out of our guest speakers than they do because I get so much exposure to them, but that doesn’t have to be the case. I think a lot of students don’t realize that we bring these speakers to campus not just for them to hear but for them to interact with. And it’s the interacting with that pays the biggest dividends. It’s not a magic formula, but there is a catch-22 in that I probably get more out of speakers because I have more general background to build upon than they do. But that’s a process, & I was once an undergrad & grad student fumbling along too. In fact, I’m still fumbling along, but here’s how to make the most of that fumbling when your department invites a speaker.

Google the Speaker
We’re all taught to beware of internet sources like Wikipedia, but what we really want you to do is be a critical reader. Wikipedia & other sources can give you a gloss. Not all speakers are gonna have the clout to have a Wikipedia page, but most will at least have a faculty page or something online that will tell you a little bit about who they are. Start there. Reading their academic work is well & good, which I will get to in a second, but read about THEM first & foremost. You’re going to be talking to them, & it’s much more interesting if you can get under the hood, so to speak. For instance, our guest speaker today is historian of science Ron Numbers. He is an eminent enough scholar in his field to be the no-brainer invite for anyone doing a lecture series on evolution that desires a historian. Never heard of him? Guess what? I hadn’t either. I’m not a historian & am not as well read outside of, uh, well, I’m not as well read as I would like to be. That’s why we have a committee to organize our series. Every single historian we’ve had on our committee has said, duh, invite Ron Numbers. So I Googled him. Wow. He grew up as a Seventh-Day Adventist! His father is a pastor. As he told me last night, his whole family are church bigwigs, he went to a Seventh-Day Adventist college, & by the time he reached the turning point in questioning his faith, he was essentially a bigtime officer in the church & an academic theologian teaching undergraduates.

Let’s pause right there. What do you know about Seventh-Day Adventists? If you’re like me, you may be thinking, ‘Not much.’ Is that important? Well, it just so happens that one of our GOP frontrunners right now is a Seventh-Day Adventist & neurosurgeon who claims Muslims are unfit for U.S. public office & that the Egyptians pyramids were really just grain silos.

So, back to Ron Numbers. Just Googling him gave me fodder for a good hour of interesting conversation at dinner last night. For instance, on this side of the evolution-Creationism debate, we often wonder, ‘the evidence is so clear, & not everyone over there is unaware of it…how can they seemingly just ignore it?’ The answer, according to Dr. Numbers, is very simply, some just CAN because it’s their agenda to ignore or explain it away. But many just need to keep their jobs. There are lots of theologians who are teaching in colleges who read & are critical thinkers, but it’s just like any of us who don’t quite agree with our bosses or institutional policies—‘Is that a windmill I really feel strongly enough to tilt or would I prefer to continue earning a salary & ensure I can feed my kids & pay the rent?’

Read Something by the Speaker
Don’t have time to sit down & read anything? Guess what. Nobody in academia does until they have tenure, then it’s just because we can get away with ignoring other things. Even now, I get around this by listening to things. Spend $5 on the vBookz app & listen to an article.

Volunteer to be a Driver or Go to Dinner
Make yourself memorable & indispensable but read the first few items here first because if you don’t have anything to talk about, this won’t work.

FINALLY, Go to the Lecture (if you can)
Sometimes, you just don’t have time, but you did all those other things. I ask my students if they made it to the ALLELE lectures & always scold them when they admit they didn’t. Honestly, honesty is overrated. If you did all of the above, what more will you learn at the lecture? Probably not much, but you will earn brownie points with your professor who put so much effort into hosting the damn thing. So go to the lecture & make sure you’re seen or have a good sack of bullshit at the ready to quell his or her ire when you tell the truth.

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“Huge service to the university and the community more generally”

Again, not to pat myself on the back, but to suggest to others what you can do to fight back against ignorance. There are protests, join them.

Million Woman MarchThere are businesses & organizations that are being attacked, support them.

donate to these companies

And there are people you can invite to speak truths you can never have experienced personally.

Dr. Joseph Graves was the first African-American to earn a Ph.D. in evolutionary biology and to get a job in evolutionary biology. In addition to giving an ALLELE talk, he met with our “Race, Ethnicity, and Human Variation” class (ANT 275). This course was designed by Professor Emeritus Jim Bindon based on Dr. Graves’ book on the history of the race concept in the U.S. and has recently been taken over by Assistant Professor Jo Weaver. So it was nothing short of a transcendent experience for everyone to have Dr. Graves himself in class to discuss his experiences and this history he knows both academically and intimately.

I am pleased for our community that it was successful. We certainly need good things to happen right now.

Class with Graves was awesome!! THANK YOU so much for arranging it!

Huge service to the university and the community more generally.

Our EvoS Club also had the pleasure of having lunch with Dr. Graves.

Dr. Graves at EvoS Club lunch. Photo by Kelly Likos, 11/10/16.

Dr. Graves at EvoS Club lunch. Photo by Kelly Likos, 11/10/16.

(L-R) Sierra Lawson, Danielle Secor, Dr. Joseph Graves, Caity Walker, Kelly Likos, and Jensen Brown. Photo courtesy Kelly Likos, North Lawn Auditorium, 11/10/16.

(L-R) Sierra Lawson, Danielle Secor, Dr. Joseph Graves, Caity Walker, Kelly Likos, and Jensen Brown. Photo courtesy Kelly Likos, North Lawn Auditorium, 11/10/16.

I admit, I’m also pleased to have gotten a few photos with Dr. Graves.

Introducing Dr. Graves' ALLELE lecture. Photo by Jo Weaver, 11/10/16.

Introducing Dr. Graves’ ALLELE lecture, North Lawn Auditorium, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL. Photo by Jo Weaver, 11/10/16.

Joseph Graves and Christopher Lynn (author) next to Joe's books, for sale at the ALLELE lecture. Photo by Avery McNeece, 11/10/16.

Joseph Graves and Christopher Lynn (author) next to Joe’s books, for sale at the ALLELE lecture. Photo by Avery McNeece, 11/10/16.

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A World Famous African-American Scientist Puts the Presidential Election in Perspective: “I Am Not Surprised At All”

On Wednesday, the day after our 2017 presidential election, I dreaded having to put on my host face to go out to dinner with Dr. Joseph Graves, our ALLELE speaker for Thursday. I couldn’t really stand the thought of talking to anyone. His talk on “Biological determinism in the age of genomics” was supposed to have been anti-climactic after Hillary’s easy sweep. We see how well that went.

Joseph Graves is the first African-American to ever earn a Ph.D. in evolutionary biology and go on to become an evolutionary biologist. Before he came here this week though, I remember wondering if, in the age of Obama, it is important to have any one scientist speak about the race concept over another scientist simply because the one speaking is black (i.e., Jim Bindon, a white male anthropologist who has spent over 30 years teaching about the fallacy of the race concept, does a great job explaining it to me, another white guy; and I, in turn, am therefore fairly at explaining it to other middle class, privileged white people).

But then Tuesday the election happened, and on Wednesday, I picked up Joe Graves for dinner, and he told me how much of a battle his whole career has been merely because he is African-American. He said that, until grad school, he thought his middle name was “Nigger” because he was addressed as such so much. And he said that the results of the presidential election actually didn’t surprise him at all because he sees every day how much 8 years of Obama has made racist America angry.

This left me stupefied. I literally could not talk about any of this at dinner. Instead, I did my best to keep up by talking about the genetics of longevity and senescence and how one goes about studying these using bacteria and nanoparticles. In essence, the daily lived experience of Joe as an African-American scientist was too painful for me because it is now directly affecting me (though that is why I had invited him), so I stuck to talking to him about sports, music, and the minutiae of his day job.

But I was the host for this ALLELE lecture, which meant that I would be introducing Joe to an audience of 200-500 people. It would be a disservice to everyone if I just phoned this one in with my usual blah blah evolutionary studies, blah blah blah thanks to your generous donations, blah blah blah follow us on Twitter. So I wrote the following intro, which I have modified for this blog, because I hope it had more resonance, was worth saying to our audience, and thus is also worth sharing here.

2016-2017 ALLELE series

FIG 1. Alabama Lectures on Life’s Evolution series schedule at the University of Alabama.

“The ALLELE series is in it 11th year. The goal of the ALLELE series is to promote evolution research, education, and outreach in our community.

evolution education fund

FIG. 2. To donate or get involved, please contact Kathy Yarbrough, me, or follow us via our website, Facebook page, or Twitter.

“On the one hand, I’m heartened that our mission is supported by an ever growing community, including several new sponsors that I’ve bolded in red in FIG. 2. But I’m going to save a little time that I’ll spend in another way—instead of telling you all about us, I’m directing you to our website, Facebook page, and Twitter account to learn more.

“On the other hand, we are not a political organization and I don’t purposely talk about politics. I am especially loathe to do so at the moment, but evolution is controversial. And in Alabama, evolution is associated with the “liberal agenda,” making it a political hot potato.

elephants

FIG. 3. The Crimson Tide elephant rolls over our rivals. What will the other elephant in the room do to us?

“So, instead of that usual introduction, I want to start by addressing the elephant in the room (FIG. 3). No, not the Crimson elephant that will roll over Mississippi State this weekend (Roll Tide?) but the one that permeates my consciousness today and likely many of yours.

onion headline

FIG. 4. From The Onion, November 9, 2016 (Vol. 52, Issue 44).

“This is me today (FIG. 4). This week, I find myself historically wrong for the first time in my life. I am devastated by our presidential election. At the cost of sounding melodramatic, it’s pretty close to the feeling that someone close to me who I didn’t expect to lose just died. And I had that experience a few years ago, so I know my reaction hasn’t been quite that extreme, but I think you get my meaning.

“This sense of devastation may surprise those who know me as the child of lower-middle class white liberals from rural Indiana. I grew up accustomed to being on the losing side through many presidential elections and keeping my mouth shut about things like the blatant racism of my classmates and neighbors. But then I fled to liberal New York, where I lived for nearly 20 years before moving to Alabama. But I moved to Alabama to take a decidedly upper-middle class job as a tenure-track professor and start, of all things, an evolutionary studies program.

starting an evos program

FIG. 5. My first blog post for the EvoS Consortium was about the non-event of starting an EvoS program in a conservative start that was obviously not threatened whatsoever.

“People back in New York and Indiana were shocked and awed at the audacity that I would start an evolution program in the Deep South. But, frankly, we encountered almost no impediments. The only rancor to starting our program came from within. There was some political resistance from the natural sciences that a social science department, Anthropology, would house the EvoS program. The only other flare-up worth note, incidentally, was over the topic of tonight’s lecture.

coyne_marks

FIG. 6. Jerry Coyne and Jonathan Marks gave back to back ALLELE lectures my first semester at UA.

“My first semester here, we hosted back-to-back lectures by evolutionary biologist Jerry Coyne and evolutionary anthropologist Jonathan Marks. I liked the Coyne lecture. It was full of information and relatively uncontroversial for those of us who have drunk deeply of the evolution Kool-Aid.

coyne

FIG. 7. Jerry Coyne is essentially a eugenicist, though a revised version.

“But in his blog (FIG. 7), Coyne comes across very differently. Coyne, Rissler, and others support a revised eugenics model which holds the biology of race as comparable to a subspecies.

marks

FIG. 8. Marks gets the genetics right, but he is equally aggressive in his tactics.

“Marks, on the other hand, I sadly missed because of a funeral. However, he got into an argument with the previous EVOWOG chair over eugenics. Marks decidedly does not support that there is any genetic basis to the race concept (FIG. 8) and—paraphrasing—said he would put his foot up the ass of anyone who does.

state science standards

FIG. 10. In 2009, Mead and Mates published a study that scored Alabama as the worst state in the nation at teaching K-12 evolution.

“Outside of this kerfuffle, no one seemed to blink an eye that the flagship state research institution in the state with the anti-evolution disclaimer on texts and the worst K-12 record in the nation for teaching evolution had started a minor in evolutionary studies. This worried me and suggested that we are essentially a non-threat. The results of Tuesday’s presidential election support that, as do Dr. Graves’ comments to me last night at dinner that he is in the minority of people who are not at all surprised by the election results.

rissler paper

FIG. 11. Former EVOWOG chair Leslie Rissler and students surveyed 2999 UA undergrads and found that most had made up their minds about evolution by the time they got here.

“A few years ago, Rissler and colleagues conducted a study here at UA among a sample of nearly 3000 undergrads and found that attitudes about science and evolution are largely set by the time students arrive as freshmen. As you can imagine, this is pretty disconcerting. Two of my goals as an anthropology and an evolution professor are (1), as Jello Biafra so prosaically articulated, to “blow minds for a living” (FIG. 12) and (2) to blow the race concept out of the water. However, the students who enroll in the majority of my courses have largely already decided what they believe and can choose many of their courses accordingly, including whether to take even a single course in anthropology or evolutionary studies.

FIG. 12. I saw Jello Biafra speak at Indiana University when I was a college freshman, and he quite literally blew my mind.

FIG. 12. I saw Jello Biafra speak at Indiana University when I was a college freshman, and he quite literally blew my mind.

“How do we “fix” a system from on high if the slim majority in the influential states (i.e., the big electoral college states) don’t believe it’s broken or don’t believe it’s broken in the same way?

krauss

FIG. 13. Physicist Lawrence Krauss talking to my “Evolution for Everyone” students about how social problems resolve themselves when previous generations die off.

“A few years ago, physicist Lawrence Krauss sat in my class talking to students and answered this same question about fixing society and changing the world. He said, you teach young people and wait for them to grow up, vote, and change the world through a demographic shift (actually, he said, you wait for the previous generation to die).

“I thought that was happening. I still think it’s happening, though I am a privileged white liberal male with a myopic, rose-tinted view of the world. That is clear. But it’s still the only direction I can think of to move in.

family & field

FIG. 14. We are studying the structure of our own discipline and—surprise surprise—we are an economically privileged lot.

“My colleague Michaela Howells and I have been studying our own discipline of anthropology and the dynamics of having a family or not while trying to be or to become a field anthropologist. Our preliminary assessment is that, if you’re born upper-middle class, regardless of race, you are more likely to be successful in your goal of going into anthropology and either postponing having kids or being able to find the resources to get them care while you work. Poor people simply have much less hope or opportunity to go to college, to get an advanced degree, and have a thriving family life.

“So how do we change that?

evo in al

FIG. 15. Our book targets K-16 educators and students with cultural backstory, the demystification of rhetoric, and resources that can be used in the classroom.

“We change that for one by starting at the bottom and educating all kids to be more aware of the possibilities in life and consider their importance. We provide more resources for teachers to teach science correctly and without the inherent anti-scientific bias of disclaimer stickers. FIG. 15 is the table of contents to a book coming out next year based initially on this series that targets K-16 teachers and students. Authors in bold are those who have spoken at UA or are our students or faculty.

race in frats

FIG. 16. Over the past few years, our students have made the national news 2-3 times for the racism of our sorority system. Our fraternity system is no better and is a hot mess of rape culture. And both were implicated in voter fraud that disenfranchised multiple respected school board members in favor of white males whose sole objective is to preserve the status quo.

“As happy and pleased with myself as I am to have invited Dr. Graves here to speak to you tonight, I think whatever we can do to support our K-12 teachers and kids are the most important things we can be doing to improve our world.

“Because this. What does it say to our kids here in Tuscaloosa that we make national news for our racist sorority system or the rape culture of our fraternity system, then go back to business as usual? How do these events seem to make so little impact?

“To improve our culture and our community, we need to start in elementary schools by creating role models and showing kids actual paths they can take to better lives.

graves flyer

FIG. 18. Flyer for Graves’ talk.

“Dr. Graves is the kind of role model we need a lot more of. He is Associate Dean for Research and Professor of Biological Sciences at the Joint School of Nanosciences and Nanoengineering of North Carolina A&T State University and UNC Greensboro. To cherry pick liberally from his NIH biosketch, Dr. Graves is a pioneering African-American evolutionary biologist with over 25 years mentoring underrepresented minority students in biomedical related research at majority and minority-serving institutions.

“His research involves three areas: (1) the genetics/genomics of adaptation, especially with regard to aging in metazoans and anti-microbial resistance to metals in bacteria, (2) the biological impact of engineered nanomaterials in bacteria, and (3) evolutionary medicine, especially as relevant to health disparities and biological conceptions of race in humans. He has published over 80 papers and book chapters and appeared in seven documentary films and numerous television programs on these topics.

books

FIG. 19. Joseph Graves has written two books and numerous articles on the race concept.

“His books on the biology of race are entitled The Emperor’s New Clothes: Biological Theories of Race at the Millennium and The Race Myth: Why We Pretend Race Exists in America, both of which are on sale here tonight. A summary of Dr. Grave’s research career can be found on Wikipedia, and he is also featured in the ABC-CLIO volume on Outstanding African-American scientists. And the list very much goes on.

sin article

FIG. 20. Published in Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science (Vol. 661, No. 1).

“As I’m sure you’ve gathered, the title of tonight’s talk is “Great is Their Sin: Biological Determinism in the Age of Genomics,” which is based on this paper (FIG. 20) he published last year in Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science.

“And so, without any further ado, I present to you, Dr. Joseph L. Graves, Jr.”

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Evolution Education in the American South

Due out soon in ebook & March 2017 in hardback: "Evolution Education in the American South," edited by Christopher Lynn, Amanda Glaze, Bill Evans, & Laura Reed

Due out soon in ebook & March 2017 in hardback: “Evolution Education in the American South,” edited by Christopher Lynn, Amanda Glaze, Bill Evans, & Laura Reed

Coming soon, I will be proud of the publication of a volume called Evolution Education in the American South: Politics, Culture, and Resources in and around Alabama that I edited with Amanda Glaze, Bill Evans, & Laura Reed. The book is devoted to, well, promoting evolution education in & around Alabama. Our goal was to use the ALLELE series, Evolution Working Group, & other lectures in & around the University of Alabama as a point of departure for providing a resource on evolution education for teachers & undergrads. The ebook is due out shortly with a hardback scheduled for March 8, 2017 from Palgrave-Macmillan. Following is a table of contents with chapter abstracts:

CHAPTER 1: “Darwinism in the American South” by Ronald L. Numbers & Lester Stevens

The conventional view of the South as the strongest bastion of opposition to Darwinism in America has been reinforced by historians focusing on the dismissal of the prominent southern professors James Woodrow and Alexander Winchell for their acceptance of the theory of evolution, highlighting the Scopes trial of 1925, and dismissing the South as intellectually stagnant. A closer look reveals, however, that, while several writers in the South expressed great antipathy to evolution, Darwinism not only enjoyed support among a considerable number of southern intellectuals but also encountered less opposition than historians have recognized. This account provides a more complete picture than is customary of responses to Darwinism in the American South.

CHAPTER 2: “Race and Evolution in Antebellum Alabama: The Polygenist Prehistory We’d Rather Ignore” by Erik L. Peterson

The name of Alabama physician Josiah Clark Nott (1804–1873) adorns a building on the campus of the University of Alabama perhaps in part because he made it possible for scientists to speak of the origins of humanity and an antiquated Earth without first nodding to Genesis. Nott popularized a fully secular science that investigated the development of humanity two decades before Darwin’s Descent of Man (1871). But Nott also provided solid scientific support for some of the most repugnant racial theories of the Victorian era. Using previously unexplored archival resources, this essay attempts to clear up the mythology surrounding Nott, the history of evolutionary theory, and the role of American science during the foundation of anthropology.

CHAPTER 3: “’The Cadillac of Disclaimers’: Twenty Years of Official Antievolutionism in Alabama” by Glenn Branch

For the last twenty years, biology textbooks in the state of Alabama have featured a disclaimer about evolution, owing to a series of decisions on the part of the Alabama state board of education. Clearly motivated by antievolution sentiment and aimed at reinforcing doubt and denial about evolution on the part of students in the state’s public schools, the disclaimer was so prominent as to have been described as “the Cadillac of disclaimers.” Because of its longevity as well as its influence, it deserves—and repays—detailed attention as a manifestation of antievolutionism.

CHAPTER 4: “Deconstructing the Alabama Disclaimer with Students: A Powerful Lesson in Evolution, Politics, and Persuasion” by Patricia H. Hawley & Rachael K. Phillips

The present chapter deconstructs the disclaimers—warning the reader about evolution – pasted into the front covers of science textbooks in Alabama. By now, one might think, disclaimer rhetoric should fall on deaf ears. However, such depictions have worked their way into the national psyche and that the misconceptions contained within them are commonly held by university biology majors. We deconstruct the rhetoric in such a way that presents the exercise as a useful pedagogical tool for changing attitudes, knowledge about the nature of science, and understanding of the anti-evolutionist movements. We close by summarizing the present state of affairs in Alabama regarding disclaimers, topped with a call to action.

CHAPTER 5: “Bridging the Gaps: Evolution and Pre-Service Science Teachers” by Amanda L. Glaze

Traditionally, university instruction is based upon the assumption that students come to higher education prepared with fundamental knowledge and understandings of content, especially those, like evolution, that are unifying theories within and across fields. However, we are finding more and more that students in postsecondary education face many of the same struggles with understanding and acceptance of evolution as found in the general public. This suggests that students entering colleges and universities may not have the level of preparation in these, and other, controversial topics. In order to understand the teaching and learning of evolution at the primary and secondary levels, we must also understand how those who teach at those levels are prepared to do so and how their own misconceptions, understandings, and world views impact their teaching. Pre-service teachers occupy a transitional position between that the role of a student and that of teacher, lending a unique viewpoint for investigating the teaching and learning of evolution in tandem.

CHAPTER 6: “Evolution Acceptance among Undergraduates in the South” by Caitlin Schrein

Over the last two decades, studies and opinion polls have sought to quantify and qualify acceptance of the facts and theory of evolution by Americans in the public and at schools and universities. These studies and polls typically examine associations between evolution acceptance and factors such as age, religiosity, or education experience. Often, goals include identifying reasons students, teachers, or the public do or do not accept evolution. Fewer studies have considered how evolution acceptance is associated with  types of variables such as personal interests, behaviors, and decision-making. In other words, researchers don’t always consider whether acceptance is the most desired outcome of exposure to evolution education.

This chapter reviews research on populations of undergraduates attending large public universities in the southeastern and southwestern United States. I consider how exposure to the theory and facts of evolution during K-12 and undergraduate schooling is associated with undergraduate student interests, behaviors, and decision-making about social issues that have a scientific basis.

CHAPTER 7: “Using Nature of Science to Mitigate Tension in Teaching Evolution” Ian Binns and Mark Bloom

The theory of evolution is a central component of biology. Yet, a 2014 Gallup survey revealed that 42% of Americans reject evolution entirely and, instead, believe that humans were created in their present form approximately 10,000 years ago. While there are many reasons that people reject the theory of evolution, we argue that a misunderstanding of nature of science (NOS) and science in general play a big part. In this chapter, two science educators present their experiences with evolution in the South. The first section, written by Ian Binns, focuses on how the controversy over evolution education in the South informed how he teaches his science methods courses. The second part, written by Mark Bloom, describes how he incorporates NOS into his teaching when addressing evolution in conservative classrooms in the South to successfully mitigate the tension that many students experience.

CHAPTER 8: “Sharing News and Views about Evolution in Social Media” by William Evans

We have harnessed social media to meet our evolved needs to communicate, learn, and form and maintain social connections. For many of us, especially those of us who reside in the American South, beliefs about evolution are constitutive of self-identity and community affiliation. As such, these beliefs are resistant to change. These beliefs may be challenged by educators, scientists, and journalists. But we tend to interpret these challenges as threats, and we tend to employ social media to reinforce our solidarity with like-minded others. It can prove difficult to teach evolution or cover it objectively as a journalist, since the topic so readily triggers emotions that discourage or even short-circuit analytical thought. Journalists may be tempted to pander to emotions, to create stories about evolution that provoke and alarm viewers. This chapter positions social media in its evolutionary context; considers the distinctive aspects of social media users in the South; and reviews trends in religious affiliation that portend continued resistance to human evolution in the South even as acceptance grows elsewhere.

CHAPTER 9: “Resources for Teaching Biological Evolution in the Deep South” by Laura K. Reed

Teaching about biological evolution at all levels brings challenges not experienced in other fields of science, especially in the American south.  Having experience teaching evolution at the college level and also doing science outreach work in public schools in Alabama has given me some insights on how to tackle the challenges of the topic.  Here I describe a number of strategies and resources that can be used to improve and enrich education in evolutionary biology at all levels.

CHAPTER 10: “Teaching Louisiana Students About Evolution by Comparing the Anatomy of Fishes and Humans” by Prosanta Chakrabarty

Students in my Ichthyology class sometimes complain I talk about evolution too much: but my Evolution class never complains that I’m talking about fishes too much. I think in the latter case I make an argument about evolution that they normally don’t hear: The human body sucks – and because most of our body parts originated in an aquatic environment, these parts suit fishes much better. For students that have the preconceived notion that humans are at the top of some imaginary evolutionary ladder, the fact that their professor is arguing that fishes might be better than humans -in anything- is perplexing. But this little seed of disbelief starts them on the path to understanding that evolution results in a Tree of Life where humans are just a single tiny and young branch, and not a “Ladder of Life” with humans sitting firmly on top far removed from the rest of the animals.

CHAPTER 11: “Teaching Evolution using Live Animals and Inquiry-Based, Self-Guided Kits” by Dale Broder and Emily A. Kane

The authors describe their experiences with evolution and science education and how this led to their interest in inquiry-based teaching. Inquiry-based evolution education programs should be effective but are relatively uncommon, likely because of the resources and expertise required to create them. University/K-12 collaborations may be a solution, but tend to be limited in their reach. Kit-based teaching allows inquiry-based evolution programs to be more broadly disseminated. Kits may also improve engagement and science self-efficacy since students take ownership of their learning and independently master science tasks. We describe an inquiry-based kit that we developed in collaboration with local teachers and an Education and Outreach Center at Colorado State University. We used three populations of locally adapted fish, Trinidadian guppies, to illustrate important concepts in evolution. Students work through the self-guided kit and booklet to complete inquiry and authentic science experiments and observations. These activities allow them to discover each concept, and finally the definition of evolution at the end of the program. We describe the kit in detail and reflect on the challenges and successes associated with its creation and implementation.

CHAPTER 12: “Trace Fossils of Alabama: Life in the Coal Age” by Ronald J. Buta

Fossils are the naturally-preserved remains of an animal that once lived and died. Body fossils of ancient animals, especially vertebrates, are considered extremely important for what they can tell us about anatomical structure. Trace fossils, on the other hand, are the preserved traces of animals that were engaged in a daily activity, such as walking, swimming, jumping, burrowing, or resting. Trace fossils were originally impressed in wet mud or sand and then preserved in solid rock. Coal mining or construction can sometimes expose the preserved traces. Trace fossils are important for what they can tell us about how ancient animals behaved.

Walker County is a remarkable source of trace fossils in Alabama. This article describes what trace fossils are, how they form, how they are exposed, and the types of traces found in Alabama coal mines.

CHAPTER 13: “What can the Alabama Mississippians Teach us about Human Evolution and Behavior?” by Paul M. Bingham, Joanne Souza, and John H. Blitz

It is an exciting time in the scientific study of humans and our evolution. The archaeology of Alabama provides particularly powerful insights and empirical evidence adding much to this study. The “new human sciences” are maturing at an ever-accelerating rate from a series of relatively isolated disciplines (including psychology, biology, paleontology, archeology, anthropology, economics, and history) into a single powerfully insightful “human” science. Moreover, this growing clarity and confidence, in turn, allows us to choose specific opportunities for fruitful study—and Alabama offers an especially elegant case.

Over the course of the Scientific Revolution of the last 400 years, we have had many occasions to watch individual sciences mature. They pass through a predictable series of steps or stages. A new science begins with what is sometimes called “natural history,” the careful description of the phenomena to be described. The growth into a mature science follows.  This is when coherent theory, unifying the entire field of study, is developed. We have also learned that this transition from natural history to maturing science always involves unification with other sciences whose insights provide indispensable explanatory components to the emerging newer science.

CHAPTER 14: “Tattooing Commitment, Quality, and Football in Southeastern North America” by Christopher D. Lynn and Cassandra A. Medeiros

Tattooing appears to be a cultural and psychological pattern of behavior rooted in Darwinian processes. It is the result of an evolved tendency to manipulate human bodies in meaningful ways with distinctive benefits. Tattooing can signal group affiliation or commitment through using the body as a human canvas. Tattooing also provides cues about biological quality because it is an injury to the body, and the healing process on the surface of the skin is visible to everyone and impossible to fake. These factors make tattoos costly honest signals, consistent with evolutionary models in multiple species, including humans. In this chapter, we review the functions of tattooing from an evolutionary perspective, outline historic and prehistoric evidence from the North American Southeast, analyze biological implications, and discuss contemporary functions of tattooing among college football fans as a signal of commitment and quality.

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Southeastern Evolutionary Perspectives

Tyler Rhodes has an amazing evolution workshop that we hope to reprise in a longer version at SEEPS 2017. Learn more about his work here: https://evolutionanimation.wordpress.com/

Tyler Rhodes has an amazing evolution workshop that we hope to reprise in a longer version at SEEPS 2017. Learn more about his work here: https://evolutionanimation.wordpress.com/

As I’ve written several times in the past (here, for example), the Southeastern U.S. has a spotty record at best at teaching evolution at the K-12 level. There are many many wonderful teachers in the Southeast, but there is also cultural resistance. My friend & colleague Amanda Glaze, now blogging for EvoS, has worked with these teachers for years. Over the past few years, we’ve begun collaborating on a number of projects that I’ll write more about in the future but that I have neglected for so long here that my brain is backlogged with the many things I want to write about (& lord knows, no one wants to read a blog post that’s longer than an ethnographic journal article—& I write them, so—oy—I am not slagging ethnographers but speaking from experience).

Here we are doing awesome fun things at Ruth Schowalter & Tony Martin's workshop because we are all awesome & fun!

Here we are doing awesome fun things at Ruth Schowalter & Tony Martin’s workshop because we are all awesome & fun!

First, this past Darwin Day cum Valentine’s Day, Amanda & I were among those on the program committee (also Michaela Howells, Steve Platek, Kilian Garvey, & David Kopaska-Merkel) for the first annual Southeastern Evolutionary Perspective Society conference. This new professional organization is dedicated to cross-disciplinary evolutionary research, education, & outreach & based in the Southeast. Like NEEPS, the Northeastern Evolutionary Psychology Society, we’re based in the region but not exclusive to it. We welcome folks from anywhere, but, as the Human Behavior & Evolution Society & Society for the Study of Evolution & other such organizations have grown immense, we wanted something we could offer for students to attend & present research at where they wouldn’t get lost, where we could meet everyone attending, & where we could talk about teaching & outreach in our local community by talking WITH our local communities. We hope SEEPS will grow, so maybe down the road, we’ll have size problems too. But in the meantime, we wanted to replicate the intimate experiences we’ve had at smaller conferences.

SEEPS 2016 & 2017 site host (& author of this blog) calling down the next contestant...& looking like a doofus with a GoPro...

SEEPS 2016 & 2017 site host (& author of this blog) calling down the next contestant…& looking like a doofus with a GoPro…

The first meeting was held over Darwin Day weekend at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa. It grew out of UA’s EvoS-hosted Darwin Day event. Hosting it on Darwin’s birthday seemed a perfect date & great way to capitalize on a time of year not already saturated with conferences. Furthermore, several NEEPS friends came down from Michigan & New York, where it’s cold that time of year. Alabama may be many things to many people, but cold in February it is not. Yay Alabama winter!

The first conference was also supported by the UA College of Arts & Sciences & a grant from HBES. The conference began with a half day on Friday, followed by a banquet with a keynote by Dean Falk & an hilarious game of PowerPoint roulette (Come to SEEPS 2017 to experience it yourself!). Saturday featured more talks, our first business meeting, a poster session, more & more talks, then a mixer at Druid City Brewing (thanks to those guys for being the official SEEPS 2016 watering hole). Sunday was another half day, beginning with an experiential workshop & followed a few more hours of talks.

UA EvoS Club: These amazing people really made SEEPS 2016 possible.

UA EvoS Club: These amazing people really made SEEPS 2016 possible.

SEEPS 2016 was such a resounding success & Tuscaloosa such a good location for it, that we decided to host it again for 2017. We do plan to shift it around, but we want to fix a few mistakes first. Changes in the coming year will include adding a Kids Evolutionary Perspectives Society (KEPS) pre-conference on Thursday, February 9 that will be all workshops targeting K-12 students, educators, & families. That will be hosted at the Alabama Natural History Museum & free to attend. SEEPS will be held over two full days on Friday & Saturday, February 10-11, with actual Darwin Day as a day of rest (like God, we all like a day to rest & just hang out with our fellow SEEPsters, or, as the case may be, drive or fly home).

We are accepting KEPS workshop & SEEPS presentation proposals through the end of this month. Follow this link for more info: http://seepsociety.weebly.com/. Contact me if you have any questions or want to get involved!

Pat Hawley (& the rest of us) are very excited to see you at SEEPS next year!

Pat Hawley (& the rest of us) are very excited to see you at SEEPS next year!

But, we warn you, there may be more of me running around doing strange things. Hosting...

But, we warn you, there may be more of me running around doing strange things. Hosting…

 

Photos by Kilian Garvey & author.

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